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Virginia Tech expert says elimination of internet privacy rules put consumer information at risk

March 28, 2017

Charles Clancy

Portrait of Charles Clancy
Charles Clancy

The U.S. House of Representatives will vote today to eliminate Internet privacy rules that could make it easier for companies to share consumer information. Charles Clancy, director of Virginia Tech’s Hume Center for National Security and Technology, says the bill demonstrates how broken the current Internet regulatory environment is for security and privacy. 

Quoting Clancy
“What's needed is a comprehensive approach to protecting personal consumer information that covers both broadband providers and web service companies.” 

“Achieving this has been challenging with regulatory and operational authorities distributed across several agencies, including the Federal Communications Commission, Federal Trade Commission, and Department of Homeland Security. This bill overturns the Federal Communications Commission's attempt at beefing up protections, which were not entirely consistent with existing Federal Trade Commission rules. Regardless of the outcome of this vote, the underlying fundamental issues need to be addressed.”

About Clancy
Clancy is an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Virginia Tech and directs of the Hume Center for National Security and Technology. Prior to joining Virginia Tech in 2010, he served as a senior researcher at the Laboratory for Telecommunications Sciences, a defense research lab at the University of Maryland, where he led research programs in software-defined and cognitive radio. His current research interests include cognitive communications and spectrum security.

About the Hume Center
The Hume Center leads Virginia Tech's research, education, and outreach programs focused on the challenges of cybersecurity and autonomy in the context of national and homeland security. Education programs provide mentorship, internships, scholarships, and seek to address key challenges in qualified U.S. citizens entering federal service. Current research initiatives include cyber-physical system security, orchestrated missions, and the convergence of cyber warfare and electronic warfare.

Interview
To secure an interview with Clancy, contact Shannon Andrea in the media relations office at sandrea@vt.edu or 703-399-9494.

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