Six Virginia Tech undergraduate students will present their research projects at the fifth annual Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Meeting of the Minds undergraduate research conference to be held at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, Ga., April 16-17.

Selection to present at Meeting of the Minds was competitive and determined by a review committee coordinated by the Office of the Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education.

The six Virginia Tech students selected to participate in the research conference are:

  • Kara Dodson of Lynchburg, Va., is a sophomore majoring in civil engineering in the College of Engineering. Her research is on “Copper Pitting: A Study of Potential Accelerants and Inhibitors in Pipe Corrosion.”
  • Heather Fine of Chesapeake, Va., is a senior majoring in English in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. Her research is on “The Better to Explore With: Curiosity in Alice in Wonderland and Little Red Riding Hood.”
  • Britanny Newman of Washington, D.C., is a senior majoring in art history in the College of Architecture and Urban Studies and English in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. Her research is on “West Meets East: Art, Politics, and Culture in Edo Japan.”
  • Chase Siuta of Virginia Beach, Va., is a senior majoring in engineering science and mechanics in the College of Engineering. His research is on ‘Using Digital Image Correlation on Pressure-loaded Blister Testing of PEM.”
  • Rebekah Torcasso of Raleigh, N.C., is a senior majoring in sociology in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. Her research is on “Perceptions of Sexuality After Sexual Assault.”
  • Erin Weiss of Woodbridge, Va., is a senior majoring in history and interdisciplinary studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. Her research is on “A New Deal for Junkies: Changing Perceptions of Addiction and Treatment, 1935-1974.”

The annual ACC Meetings of the Minds conference has become an opportunity for universities in the conference to highlight the diversity of research work being completed by undergraduates and for students to share their work with peers. Students present their work in one of three formats: oral presentations, posters, or models and exhibits.