Retired Brig. Gen. Jack Grubbs will discuss leadership and ethics in the guest lecture, “Parking Lines to Ponzi Schemes: The Ethical Spectrum,” at the Pamplin College of Business symposium on business ethics on Tuesday, March 27, at 7 p.m. at Virginia Tech’s Burruss Auditorium.

Grubbs served 35 years in the U.S. Army. Following his military career, he served on the engineering faculty and senior administration of Tulane University. A graduate of West Point, he received a master of science in engineering from Princeton and a doctorate in civil engineering from Rensselaer. He later was a principal owner of a construction consulting company in Charlotte, N.C.

During his visit, Grubbs will meet Pamplin faculty members for an informal seminar. The symposium, the 21st annual event, will be part of a series of campus events exploring ethical issues in various disciplines this month.

“As in previous years, we will be tying this symposium in with graduate and undergraduate strategy courses and ethics courses taught in Pamplin,” said Rich Wokutch, management professor and director of the department’s undergraduate programs. “We invite faculty teaching other courses to consider ethical issues related to the subject matter of their courses.”

The symposium is sponsored by the Business Leadership Center of the Department of Management and by Pamplin accounting alumni Robert F. Hogan Jr., who earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in accounting in 1978 and 1980, respectively, and Jorge Del Alamo Jr., who earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting in 1969, and his wife Lin.

Previous symposium speakers have included academics, authors, government officials, and executives from Tyco, Enron, Arthur Andersen, and Fairmont Hotels and Resorts.

The talk is free and open to the public, no tickets needed. Find parking information online. For assistance, call 540-231-6353. Questions about the speaker and other ethics-related events should be addressed to Richard Wokutch.

 

 

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