O’Shaughnessy Hall is ready to welcome students, faculty, and staff for the 2018-19 academic year.

The $21.5 million renovation project began in May 2017 and was completed on schedule earlier this month. Built in 1966, the 69,211-square-foot residence hall will house 335 students as the Leadership and Social Change Residential College, the newest of Virginia Tech’s three residential colleges.

Residential colleges provide transformational learning opportunities outside the classroom and offer students the chance to live with a live-in faculty principal and other students with similar interests such, as service, the arts, and innovation. Virginia Tech launched its first two residential colleges in 2010 and 2011 in East and West Ambler Johnston halls.

Collaboration, discussion, and exploration – values underscored by the university’s living-learning communities – are reflected throughout the building’s many new community spaces: classroom, living room, faculty meeting area, open kitchen, and exterior courtyard. The new floorplan also features a faculty apartment and five faculty and staff offices.

Interior upgrades include a new air conditioning system, Wi-Fi, energy-efficient windows, water-efficient plumbing, modern furnishings, and a unique glass-enclosed stairway. The building was renovated in conjunction with Virginia Energy Conservation and Environmental Standards (VEES) and is on track to receive LEED Silver Certification for Commercial Interiors. Building materials were secured through sustainable procurement practices.

As part of ongoing Master Plan efforts, Virginia Tech is committed to providing an accessible and inclusive campus. New O’Shaughnessy improvements include ADA-compliant student rooms, bathrooms, and restrooms; an accessible open kitchen; an accessible faculty apartment and accessible, barrier-free courtyard.

O'Shaughnessy Hall Entrance
Interior upgrades to O'Shaughnessy Hall include a new air conditioning system, Wi-Fi, energy-efficient windows, water-efficient plumbing, modern furnishings, and a unique glass-enclosed stairway.

“The on-schedule renovation of O’Shaughnessy Hall is a reflection of the strong collaboration and commitment among the Facilities DepartmentStudent Affairs, and the construction and architect teams. We are grateful for Student Affairs for their steadfast vision and partnership on the project,” said Project Manager Aaron Curfiss.

“We believe that O’Shaughnessy Hall and the Leadership and Social Change Residential College will be a dynamic learning space where our students and talented faculty can engage in important dialogue about how leadership and service can improve our world,” said Frank Shushok, senior associate vice president for Student Affairs.

O'Shaughnessy Hall New Lounge Area
Collaboration, discussion, and exploration – values underscored by the university’s living-learning communities – are reflected throughout the building’s many new community spaces.

O’Shaughnessy Hall is named for 1903 alumnus Louis O’Shaughnessy, who worked at his alma mater from 1918 to 1954 as a professor, head of applied mechanics, acting dean of engineering, and director of graduate studies. Renowned for his memory, O’Shaughnessy taught mathematics and engineering-related course before becoming the first head of applied mechanics, which he built into a strong department.

The architect/engineer for the renovation was Moseley Architects, working in collaboration with Lord Aeck Sargent. The contractor was W.M. Jordon Company.

O'Shaughnessy Hall New Meeting Room
The new meeting room in O'Shaughnessy Hall is highlighted by a distinct wall made of recycled magazines and newspapers.

Project Details:

Building Number

029

Gross Square Footage

69,211 GSF

Virginia Tech Project Manager

Aaron Curfiss

Construction Manager

W.M. Jordan Company

A/E

Moseley Architects in collaboration with Lord Aeck Sargent

Project Budget

$21,500,000

Construction Status

Complete

Project Completion

August 2018

LEED Certification

On track to receive Silver LEED Certification.


Related Links:

O’Shaughnessy Hall renovations underway

New faculty principal aims to engage students on a deeper level


Written by Alexa Magdalenski